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Posts Tagged ‘Latino Vote’

Well-Known GOP Political Commentator Suggests Republicans Abandon Immigration Reform

February 4th, 2014 No comments
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As Republican politicians wrestle with the thorny issue of immigration reform, they need to remember one thing: Conservative commentator Ann Coulter is always right.

If you don’t believe she’s always right, you’re either a weak-kneed Republican-in-name-only or a sexist America-hating leftie. That’s a lose-lose, so the GOP should listen up.

Republicans gathered in Maryland recently for the party’s annual retreat and polka party, and a key item on the agenda was forging a cohesive plan to address the country’s broken immigration system. To help out, Coulter wrote the lawmakers a 900-word anti-pep talk titled: “GOP Crafts Plan to Wreck the Country, Lose Voters.

In her piece, Coulter puts forth the reasoned argument that immigrants will never vote for Republicans, so to heck with them.

Coulter reached that conclusion after reading what she calls a “stunning report” by conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly. The report seems to be a collection of data plucked from various polls and designed to prove Schlafly’s point, which is basically that immigrants are un-American and the GOP should deal only with white people.

Bipartisan Group of Senators Offer Immigration Reform Proposal

January 29th, 2013 No comments
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A bipartisan group of senators has agreed on a set of principles for a sweeping overhaul of the immigration system, including a pathway to American citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants that would hinge on progress in securing the borders and ensuring that foreigners leave the country when their visas expire.

The senators were able to reach a deal by incorporating the Democrats’ insistence on a single comprehensive bill that would not deny eventual citizenship to illegal immigrants, with Republican demands that strong border and interior enforcement had to be clearly in place before Congress could consider legal status for illegal immigrants.

Their blueprint, unveiled on Monday, will allow them to stake out their position one day before President Obama outlines his immigration proposals in a speech on Tuesday in Las Vegas, in the opening moves of what lawmakers expect will be a protracted and contentious debate in Congress this year.

Lawmakers said they were optimistic that the political mood had changed since a similar effort collapsed in acrimony in 2010. Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona and one of the negotiators, said he saw “a new appreciation” among Republicans of the need for an overhaul.

“Look at the last election,” Mr. McCain said Sunday morning on ABC’s “This Week With George Stephanopoulos.” “We are losing dramatically the Hispanic vote, which we think should be ours.” The senator also said he had seen “significant improvements” in border enforcement, although “we’ve still got a ways to go.”

He added, “We can’t go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows in an illegal status.”

President Obama has already changed some rules that will help families in which one spouse is in the United States illegally. Those plans will go into effect on March 4th, 2013.

Senator McCain Calls for Republicans to get behind Immigration Reform

November 27th, 2012 No comments
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Sen. John McCain added his voice on Sunday to a growing chorus of Republicans calling for immigration reform, underscoring the issue’s emergence after an election in which Democrats resoundingly won the Latino vote.

America’s Hispanic population has surged over the past decade, and McCain alluded to how the country’s shifting demographics are altering the political landscape. In an appearance on Fox News Sunday, the Arizona Republican said his party would need to adapt.

“We have to have a bigger tent. No doubt about it. And obviously we have to do immigration reform,” McCain said. “There is no doubt whatsoever that the demographics are not on our side.”

McCain is not the first Republican to stress this point. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has become the party’s leading spokesman for a more welcoming immigration stance, warning that the strident pro-enforcement rhetoric pervading much of the debate cannot compete with the growing clout of Latino voters.

Shortly after President Obama won a second term, Sen. Lindsay Graham of South Carolina appeared on “Face the Nation” and acknowledged that a hardline stance on immigration had “built a wall between the Republican Party and the Hispanic community.”

Republicans Might Finally Be Ready to Focus on Immigration Reform . . . Finally

November 8th, 2012 No comments
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Top Republicans are signaling for the first time in five years that the party will get serious about immigration reform.

Immigration’s sudden rise to the top of Washington’s to-do list after years on the legislative back burner spotlights how worried Republicans are about Latinos abandoning their party. The renewed interest in tackling the issue, if sustained, would represent a fundamental shift for Republicans, who allowed conservative firebrands to set the agenda on immigration after several failed attempts to pass a bill during the Bush administration.

“It’s clear to me, if Republicans are going to have the opportunity to be in the majority, we clearly have to determine how we deal with minority and Latino voters,” said Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran, who is running for the National Republican Senatorial Committee chairmanship. “In some fashion, the way we have dealt with immigration gives us a black eye. And we need to figure out how to talk about issues and pursue policies that matter to Latino, Hispanic voters.”

Obama told the Des Moines Register editorial board last month that he was confident immigration reform would get done next year. He mused at the time that Republicans, after years of Latino alienation, would need to repair their relationship with one of the fastest-growing demographic groups.

Obama is expected to pursue a broad proposal early next year, Democratic officials said Wednesday.

“It’s self-inflicted. It’s almost a suicidal tendency they have to be relegated for the next — I would say — generation as a minority party,” Rep Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) said.

The stats from Tuesday’s election tell a grim tale for Republicans.

Exit polls found that Obama picked up 71 percent of the Latino vote while Republican Mitt Romney received only 27 percent — a steep drop-off from Bush’s 44 percent in 2004 and 35 in percent 2000. Those figures were in line with a 75-23 margin in an election eve poll by Latino Decisions of 5,600 Latino voters across all 50 states.

If Romney had picked up even 35 percent of the Latino vote, Tuesday’s election may have turned out differently, said Stanford University professor Gary Segura, who conducted the survey by Latino Decisions, which has done extensive polling of Hispanic voters.

“For the first time in U.S. history, the Latino vote can plausibly claim to be nationally decisive,” Segura said.

Thirty-one percent of those surveyed said they would be more likely to vote Republican if the party took a role in passing an overhaul bill with a pathway to citizenship.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1112/83552_Page2.html#ixzz2BfNMFPgK

Did the Latino Vote Win Re-Election for Obama

November 7th, 2012 No comments
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Mitt Romney and the Republican Party’s tremendous difficulty appealing to Latino voters dealt a significant blow to their chances of winning in 2012.

Romney got off on the wrong foot with Latino voters early in the campaign. During the GOP primary, he took a hard line on immigration, endorsing the concept of “self-deportation” that would implement immigration crackdown policies to spur undocumented immigrants to leave the country on their own.

The Republican candidate tried to moderate his rhetoric over the next several months, but the damage was already done. According to the national exit polls, Obama won 71 percent of the Latino vote while Romney won 27 percent. That’s an improvement over Obama’s 2008 performance when Latinos backed him 67-31 percent over Republican John McCain and the largest Democratic margin since 1996. To give you an idea of how badly the GOP’s Latino support has eroded, just eight years ago, George W. Bush won around 40 percent of the Latino vote.

Obama faced questions about higher-than-average unemployment among Latino voters and a lack of progress on immigration reform during his first term. But he was able to energize Latino voters, especially after he enacted a program over the summer to provide a temporary reprieve from deportation to young undocumented immigrants.

Today, several news outlets are suggesting the GOP needs to change it’s policy on immigration.

Where do Romney and Obama Stand on Immigration Issues

November 6th, 2012 No comments
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PRESIDENT OBAMA:

In an attempt to get some immigration legislation on the books, Obama had urged Congress to pass the Dream Act, which would give young illegal immigrants who were brought to the United States as children a path to citizenship if they attend college or serve in the military.

However, in June, Obama issued an executive order to allow many immigrants brought illegally to the United States as children to be exempted for two years from deportation and granted work permits if they apply to the government. The exemption also applies to children who are students and/or veterans.

Some 1.7 million people could be eligible for the program, according to estimates. Tens of thousands have applied since August.

Obama has stated that the government should focus on sending back criminals and recent arrivals rather than minors and families who are already settled in the U.S.

As for legal immigration, Obama has repeatedly said he supports legislation, backed by some business sectors, that would increase the number of highly skilled foreign workers and entrepreneurs who can enter the U.S. on special visas or apply to immigrate.

MITT ROMNEY:

In the GOP primary debates, Romney attacked his fellow Republicans when he felt they were being too soft on immigration. He has consistently said he opposes providing “amnesty” for illegal immigrants.

He also says he favors a fence along the U.S.-Mexico border. He opposes education benefits to illegal immigrants and opposes offering legal status to illegal immigrants who attend college—but would do so for those who serve in the armed forces.

Romney, if elected, has said he would establish a national immigration-status verification system for employers and punish them if they hire noncitizens who do not prove their authorized status.

Romney has not specifically said he supports the immigration laws in Arizona, Alabama, but he has called Arizona “a model” for the nation on immigration And he has urged the Justice Department to drop its lawsuit against the Arizona legislation.

On legal immigration, Romney has said that he favors allowing into the country skilled and highly educated workers, who are favored by American high-tech firms and other industries. He has criticized the current annual limit (140,000) on the number of high-skilled visas—saying “it is a barrier to the kinds of immigrants the country needs to remain innovative.”

Read more about each candidate’s immigration positions here.

Romney Vows to Honor Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) Program

October 2nd, 2012 No comments
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Young illegal immigrants who receive temporary work permits to stay in the United States under an executive order issued by President Barack Obama would not be deported under a Mitt Romney administration, the GOP presidential hopeful told The Denver Post Monday.

“The people who have received the special visa that the president has put in place, which is a two-year visa, should expect that the visa would continue to be valid. I’m not going to take something that they’ve purchased,” Romney said. “Before those visas have expired we will have the full immigration reform plan that I’ve proposed.”

In June, Obama issued an executive order ( Later entitled Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or “DACA”) that will allow the so-called “dreamers” — kids who were brought here by their illegal immigrant parents when they were young — a temporary reprieve from deportation if they stay out of trouble and meet certain requirements such as graduating from a U.S. high school.

The Obama administration has sharply criticized Romney’s earlier ideas for immigration reform, which have called for all aliens living in the U.S. illegally to self-deport.

Romney said in a sit-down interview with The Post aboard his campaign bus ahead of a Denver rally that he would work with Congress in the first year to pass permanent immigration reform legislation.

He didn’t furnish specifics on that plan, but has said in previous interviews that students who served in the military may get a path to citizenship.

“I actually will propose a piece of legislation which will reform our immigration system to improve legal immigration so people don’t have to hire lawyers to figure out how to get here legally,” Romney said. “The president promised in his first year, his highest priority, that he would reform immigration and he didn’t. And I will.”

Obama’s order mirrors the “DREAM” Act, which has been dead on arrival in every Congress that’s tried to pass it. It was blocked by Senate Republicans two years ago.

Romney also was hazy about the future of Colorado’s medical marijuana industry, which reaps more than $5 million a year in state sales taxes, saying his administration would enforce federal drug laws, that prohibit marijuana for any use.

“I oppose marijuana being used for recreational purposes and I believe the federal law should prohibit the recreational use of marijuana,” he said.

Romney will spend Tuesday holed up preparing for the first presidential debate Wednesday at the University of Denver. He said he was looking forward to sharing a stage with the president to clear up distortions of the last few months.

If you are considering the DACA program, contact The Nunez Firm to schedule a consultation. Managing attorney Jay Nunez will personally meet with you to help you better understand the potential benefits and risks of applying.

Are Republicans Changing Stance on Immigration Reform to Woo Latino Vote?

April 3rd, 2012 No comments
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Congressional Republicans and Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign are working to fashion proposals that could make up ground with Hispanic voters, concerned rhetoric on immigration from many in the party is turning away the increasingly powerful constituency.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R., Fla.) is developing a scaled-back version of the DREAM Act, which would allow people brought to the U.S. as children to gain legal status, but not citizenship, if they enroll in college or the military. Several Senate Republicans have signed on to bipartisan legislation aimed at broadening access to the legal immigrant visa system.

The Romney campaign is looking for new proposals that would show he backs legal immigration, trying to pivot from a primary campaign in which he has taken a tough line on assistance to those here illegally.

It’s unclear whether any of these initiatives will bear fruit, but there is an increasing sense among some in the party of the need to try.

Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/politics/2012/04/02/republicans-try-to-woo-latinos-with-new-immigration-proposals/#ixzz1quImaqhM

Republican Candidates Losing Ground to Obama Among Latino Voters

March 12th, 2012 No comments
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Despite growing disappointment in his handling of immigration issues, Latino voters favor President Barack Obama by six-to-one over any of the Republican presidential hopefuls, showed a Fox News Latino poll conducted under the direction of Latin Insights and released Monday.

The national poll of likely Latino voters indicated that 73 percent of them approved of Obama’s performance in office, with over half those questioned looking favorably upon his handling of the healthcare debate and the economy, at 66 percent and 58 percent respectively.

Released on the eve of the Super Tuesday primaries in the race for the GOP nomination, the Fox News Latino poll shows former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney with 35 percent of Latino voter support, to Texas Rep. Ron Paul’s 13 percent, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich’s 12 percent, and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum’s 9 percent.

But the poll shows that the overwhelming choice among likely Latino voters is President Obama. In head-to-head match-ups none of the GOP candidates would garner more than 14 percent of the Latino vote come November, the poll said.

It is widely known that the Latino Vote is becoming more crucial with every year that passes.

Republican Candidates Continue to Ignore Latino Voters and Evolving Electorate

February 3rd, 2012 No comments
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Campaigning in Florida this month, GOP Presidential candidates continued to display a general lack of understanding of the state’s diversifying Latino population. While it’s well-documented that the Cuban-American population is currently a strong political force, the emerging story in Florida is that the state’s future voting population will become increasingly Latino, but less Cuban.

While it’s normal for political candidates to pander to today’s registered voters, they undermine the long-term electoral prospects of their party when they fail to recognize Florida’s changing demographics. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveal that increasing numbers of Florida’s children are non-Cuban Latinos. Overall, Latinos make up 26% of persons under age 18.

More striking, however—given Florida’s long association with Cuban immigration—is that the Cuban-origin portion of the Latino population is shrinking when you look at the youngest Floridians.

While Cubans are a majority of Florida Latinos over age 70, every Latino age group below 70 is becoming increasingly non-Cuban. Cubans are more than half (54%) of Florida Latinos aged 65 and over, but they are only 22% of Latino children in the state. Simply put, the Cuban population is getting older while a younger, non-Cuban Latino population continues to grow.

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