Archive

Posts Tagged ‘illegal employment’

Supreme Court Upholds Arizona’s Immigration Law Sanctioning Employers that Hire Undocumented Aliens

June 5th, 2011 1 comment
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Arizona’s law that penalizes businesses for hiring workers who are in the US illegally was upheld by The Supreme Court rejecting arguments that states have no role in immigration matters.

Recently, the court said that federal immigration law gives states the authority to impose sanctions on employers who hire unauthorized workers.

The federal law makes the federal government the exclusive enforcer of immigration violations exempting state licensing provisions. However, Arizona defines licensing to include virtually all business permits, from incorporation documents to partnership agreements, and under state law, if an employer knowingly hires an illegal immigrant worker, the business can be fined for the first offense, and a second offense can mean you lose the right to do business in the state.

Business interests and civil liberties groups challenged the law, backed by the Obama administration.

The measure was signed into law in 2007 by Democrat Janet Napolitano, then the governor of Arizona and now the administration’s homeland security secretary. Lower courts, including the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, previously upheld the law.

 

Arizona Is a Haven for Refugess Despite Being the Scourge of Illegal Immigrants

October 17th, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Apparently, in Arizona, illegal immigrants get the boot. But refugees get the welcome mat. Only three states accepted more refugees on a per capita basis over the past six years. Furthermore, Arizona took nearly twice as many refugees per capita as its liberal neighbor, California, and more than twice as many per capita as New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

According to the vice president at the International Rescue Committee, which resettles refugees in a dozen states, in the degree of welcome and receptivity, he would certainly put Arizona at the top.

The work contrasts with the state’s renown as the scourge of illegal immigrants, whom critics blame for driving up crime, stealing jobs and burdening hospitals and schools.
In addition, the State Senator, a Republican who is a leading critic of illegal immigration claimed they are not anti-immigrant, however they expect people to follow the law.

Numerically, the groups do not compare; Arizona took in about 4,700 refugees last year, but is thought to have about 375,000 illegal immigrants. Refugees are not economic migrants but survivors of war and persecution whom the United States admits for humanitarian and foreign policy reasons.

Arizona first drew refugees because the cost of living is low, and until the recession the state had lots of entry-level jobs open to non-English speakers, like housekeeping and lawn care.
Last year, the federal government admitted about 75,000 refugees, out of 10.5 million worldwide, and it covers most resettlement costs. State officials administer the money and help decide how many refugees they can take; private agencies do the casework, helping find housing and jobs.

The flip side of the Arizona story includes the Maricopa County sheriff, Joe Arpaio, who courts a national following by advertising his toughness toward illegal immigrants
Mr. Arpaio conducts frequent raids on immigrant neighborhoods, stopping people for minor infractions and reviewing their immigration status. He says these raids have netted many illegal immigrants. Critics say they spread fear and harass legal residents.

Victor Acevedo, an illegal immigrant from Mexico, said he was stopped in January after failing to use his turn signal and was found with a small amount of marijuana. He is now awaiting deportation in one of Mr. Arpaio’s famed prison tents, dressed in the standard outfit: black stripes and pink underwear.  In a tent-side interview in 107-degree heat, Mr. Acevedo, 29, said he came nine years ago for a better livelihood, found a landscaping job, married an American and had two American-born sons. He was deported in 2008 but then returned a year later to be with his family.

Refugees seem slow to sympathize. The two groups often compete for jobs or housing, and some refugees say Latino gangs have preyed on them. A refugee acknowledged that he, too, crossed a border illegally when he fled to Kenya.  However in the US the situation is different: you need documents!

Meg Whitman Seen As a Hypocrite on Immigration

October 5th, 2010 1 comment
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman made herself into a very large target at UC  Davis when she declared: “We do have to hold employers accountable for hiring only documented workers, and we do have to enforce that law.”

Despite the revelation the next day that she herself had employed an illegal immigrant maid for nine years — unbeknownst to her, she says — Whitman repeated the admonition in a second contentious encounter with Brown on Saturday at Cal State Fresno:

“If we don’t hold employers accountable, we will never get our arms around this [illegal immigration] problem.”

Whitman admitted employing an illegal immigrant before her former housekeeper, Nicky Diaz, appeared with attorney Gloria Allred to accuse Whitman of knowingly violating federal law and “throwing me away like a piece of garbage” once her employment became politically unpalatable.

Colin Powell Calls For Passage of The Dream Act and A Path for Legalization

September 24th, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a moderate Republican, urged his party Sunday to support immigration generally because illegal immigrants do essential work in the U.S. In an interview with NBC’s “Meet the Press,” he said a path to legal status should be offered to illegal immigrants because they “are doing things we need done in this country.”

According to Powell, illegal immigrants are all over his house whenever he calls for repairs. However, Powell did not say whether he’s hired illegal immigrants directly or they showed up with contractors. In lamenting the party’s rightward drift Sunday, he said Republicans must not become anti-immigration and spoke in support of legislation that would give certain children of illegal immigrants a way to become citizens if they pursue a college education or military service – The Dream Act.

Powell also said “fringe” elements on the right are taking a low road when they label Obama a foreign-born Muslim and peddle other false theories about non-American influences on the president’s character. Obama was born in the U.S. and is Christian. “Let’s attack him on policy, not nonsense,” he said.

Ohio is One of 22 States Considering State Immigration Laws Against Illegal Immigration

August 22nd, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Ohio is one of 22 states that has immigration reform bills pending. Americans for Legal Immigration PAC, an organization focused on fighting against amnesty and illegal immigration, announced that 22 states now have lawmakers pushing versions of Arizona’s illegal immigration bill SB 1070. Activists from Americans for Legal Immigration PAC, or ALIPAC, supported passage of the new Arizona law and have helped pass other immigration enforcement measures in many states.

According to William Gheen, president of ALIPAC, activists have been working hard contacting state lawmakers in every state in the US asking them to stand up with Arizona. Additionally, Gheen stated that there are 22 states now following Arizona’s lead.

Aside from Ohio, the other states considering versions of the bill include: Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Utah.

Dave Isaacs, deputy director of communications for the Ohio House of Representatives, said there are three bills currently in committee that deal with immigration reform. One of the bills requires public and private employers to register with a federal electronic system to verify the identities and legal working status of new employees.

The other two bills have gone nowhere in the House since clearing the Senate in March. Both would give local law enforcement agencies authority to enforce violations of federal immigration law, which is similar to the Arizona immigration law SB 1070.

Immigrant Families Leave Arizona Due To New Anti-Immigrant Law

July 7th, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

A family is in a hurry to get out of Arizona, to get away from the state’s harsh new immigration law. They still have a long way to their final destination: Pennsylvania. However, the hardest part of the nearly 2,700-mile journey will be the end. Their final destination is where starting their lives over begins.

Luis and Marlen, both 33, lived in Arizona for more than 15 years. They are from the same small town in southern Mexico, but they met while living in the US. Both came looking for work.

Their three children are U.S. citizens were born in Arizona. The oldest is a quiet 13-year-old, a 10-year-old girl that loves to talk., and a 2-year-old baby.

Luis has washed for the past four years, and has worked as a landscaper for a company that maintains office buildings in the West Valley. He earned $9.80 an hour. Marlen is a stay-at-home mom.

The couple started thinking about leaving Arizona when Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio began conducting his crime sweeps two years ago, saturating largely Latino neighborhoods with deputies, stopping vehicles for minor traffic violations and arresting illegal immigrants. The couple said the sweeps made them feel like prisoners. They used to enjoy spending Sundays at the park. But to avoid the police, they started staying home as much as possible.

The day after Gov. Jan Brewer signed Arizona’s new immigration law on April 23, Luis and Marlen decided to leave. And, they are not alone.

Nebraska Town Votes to Banish Illegal Aliens

June 30th, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Residents of Fremont, a small city in Nebraska, voted Monday to banish illegal aliens from jobs and rental homes. The law would bar landlords from renting to those in the country illegally.

Opponents of the new law argued that the City of Fremont simply could not afford the new law. They said that paying to defend such a local law, which is all but certain to be challenged in court, would require a significant cut in Fremont city services, or a stiff tax increase, or both.

However advocates argued that federal authorities had failed to enforce their own immigration restriction and that they had to take care of such matters themselves. They complained that illegal immigrants were causing an increase in crime, taking jobs that would once have gone to longtime residents, and changing the character of their quiet city, some 30 miles of farm fields from Omaha.

Shortly after the results were announced, officials from the A.C.L.U. Nebraska pledged to file a lawsuit as quickly as possible; claiming that if this law goes into effect it will cause discrimination and racial profiling against Latinos and others who appear to be foreign born, including U.S. citizens.

Fremont’s Hispanic population, practically nonexistent two decades ago, has grown to about 2,000 people, according to some estimates. Moreover, no one knows how many illegal immigrants live in Fremont.

In recent years, many towns and cities across the nation considered adopting laws restricting illegal immigrants. However, in most cases, political leaders and town councils have been the ones to pass the provisions and not the voters. Additionally, the laws have proven politically-tangled: measures in some towns are still being fought in court, while some other cities have dropped the issue.

Immigration Enforcement without Comprehensive Immigration Reform Will Not Work.

May 28th, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

This week, the Senate will consider amendments to the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Bill that would add thousands of additional personnel along the border (including the National Guard), as well as provide millions of dollars for detention beds, technology, and resources.  Yesterday, bowing to pressure, President Obama announced that he would send 1,200 National Guard troops to the border and request $500 million for additional resources.  All of this attention on resources for the border ignores the fact that border enforcement alone is not going to resolve the underlying problems with our broken immigration system.

For more than two decades, the U.S. government has tried without success to stamp out unauthorized immigration through enforcement efforts at the border and in the interior of the country, but without fundamentally reforming the broken immigration system that spurs unauthorized immigration in the first place.  While billions upon billions of dollars have been poured into enforcement, the number of unauthorized immigrants in the United States has increased dramatically.

The only way to stop illegal immigration is to punish the employers who hire unauthorized workers. The best way to stop employers from hiring illegally is by offering lawful permanent residence to illegal immigrants that cooperate with federal authorities in prosecuting the employers that hire them. If an employer hires an unauthorized worker and the worker reports the hiring to the federal government and cooperates with the prosecution, the worker should be granted lawful permanent residence. This would stop employers from continue the practice of hiring undocumented workers. If the US government was serious about stopping illegal immigration, they would start with the source of the problem, which is the pull effect of illegal employment in the US.

Study Shows that Immigrants Do NOT Steal Jobs from Americans

May 28th, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

A coalition of groups that want to limit immigration, legal and illegal, has an ad claiming that illegal immigrants steal jobs from Americans. That’s a popular talking point among the build-the-fence, seal-the border types, but it’s just not so.

The truth is that immigrants don’t take American jobs, according to most economists and others who have studied the issue.

Policy analyst at the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute, Madeleine Sumption, claims that Immigrant workers create almost as many jobs as they occupy. Additionally Sumption added that Immigrant workers often create the jobs they work in and they also buy things making the economy bigger.

As she and a co-author wrote in a report last year for a group created by the British government:

Somerville and Sumption: The impact of Immigration on a nation’s economy remains small, for several reasons. Immigrants are not competitive in many types of jobs, and hence are not direct substitutes for natives. Local employers increase demand for low-skilled labor in areas that receive low-skilled immigrant inflows. Immigrants contribute to demand for goods and services that they consume, in turn increasing the demand for labor. And immigrants contribute to labor market efficiency and long-term economic growth.

Of course, none of that matters to the folks who don’t live in the reality-based universe.

ACLU and Coalition of Civil Rights Groups File Class Action Against Arizona for Anti-Immigrant Law

May 22nd, 2010 No comments
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Technorati
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

The American Civil Liberties Union and a coalition of civil rights groups filed a class action lawsuit today in the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona challenging Arizona’s new law which authorizes police to demand “papers” from people who they suspect are not legally in the U.S.

The coalition filing the lawsuit includes the ACLU, MALDEF, National Immigration Law Center (NILC), and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), ACLU of Arizona, National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) and the Asian Pacific American Legal Center (APALC) – a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice.

The lawsuit charges that the Arizona law unlawfully interferes with federal power and authority over immigration matters in violation of the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution; invites racial profiling against people of color by law enforcement in violation of the equal protection guarantee and prohibition on unreasonable seizures under the 14th and Fourth Amendments; and infringes on the free speech rights of day laborers and others in Arizona.

One of the individuals the coalition is representing in the case, Jim Shee, who is a U.S.-born 70-year-old American citizen of Spanish and Chinese descent. Shee asserts that he will be vulnerable to racial profiling under the law, and that, although the law has not yet gone into effect, he has already been stopped twice by local law enforcement officers in Arizona and asked to produce his “papers” to proof his legal presence in the U.S.

Another plaintiff, Jesus Cuauhtémoc Villa, is a resident of the state of New Mexico who is currently attending Arizona State University. The state of New Mexico does not require proof of U.S. citizenship or immigration status to obtain a driver’s license. Villa does not have a U.S. passport and does not want to risk losing his birth certificate by carrying it with him. He worries about traveling in Arizona without a valid form of identification that would prove his citizenship to police if he is pulled over. If he cannot supply proof upon demand, Arizona law enforcement is required to arrest and detain him.

Several prominent law enforcement groups, including the Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police, oppose the law because the law sends a clear message to communities of color that the authorities are not to be trusted, making them less likely to come forward as victims of or witnesses to crime.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of labor, domestic violence, day laborer, human services and social justice organizations, including Friendly House, Service Employees International Union (SEIU), SEIU Local 5, United Food and Commercial Workers International (UFCW), Arizona South Asians for Safe Families (ASAFSF), Southside Presbyterian Church, Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Asian Chamber of Commerce of Arizona, Border Action Network, Tonatierra Community Development Institute, Muslim American Society, Japanese American Citizens League, Valle del Sol, Inc., Coalicíon De Derechos Humanos, and individual named plaintiffs who will be subject to harassment or arrest under the law and a class of similarly situated persons.

According to Pablo Alvarado, Executive Director of NDLON day laborers have repeatedly defended their First Amendment rights in federal courts and successfully established their undeniable right to seek work in public areas. Moreover, Alvarado believes that Arizona’s effort to criminalize day laborers and migrants is an affront to the Constitution and threatens to disrupt national unity, and they are confident that federal courts will intervene to ensure the protection of their bedrock civil rights.”

Even prior to the passage of the statute, local enforcement of federal immigration law has already caused an increase on racial profiling of Latinos in Arizona. The ACLU, MALDEF and other members of the coalition have several pending lawsuits against government officials in Arizona because of civil rights abuses of U.S. citizens and immigrants.

site by hikanoo