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Posts Tagged ‘illegal aliens’

Immigration and Customs Enforcement Detained 13 Pregnant Women During Four Month Stretch in 2013

January 9th, 2014 No comments
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Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials in El Paso, Texas, detained 13 pregnant women from August to November 2013, according to an investigation by Fusion.

ICE confirmed the number to BuzzFeed and said the undocumented immigrant women were an enforcement priority because they had either recently entered the country or had been issued final orders of removal.

Fusion’s investigation was in part launched after Sergio Garcia-Leco, an undocumented activist, infiltrated the El Paso Processing Center in December.

The report describes 13 pregnant women who were detained during a four-month stretch after attempted border crossings; the time each woman was detained varied — some were released the same day, while others were kept days or even weeks, ICE told Fusion.

ICE told BuzzFeed they are unable to name all of the women because of medical privacy issues but did identify two.

Disappointing Ninth Circuit Decision Preventing Aliens from Suing Federal Agents for Wrongful Detention

November 4th, 2011 No comments
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Summary:   Aliens not lawfully in the United States cannot sue federal agents for monetary damages based on a claim of wrongful detention pending deportation, given the extensive remedial procedures available to and invoked by them and the unique foreign policy considerations implicated in the immigration context.

Mirmehdi v. United States

Federal Judge Upholds Key Provisions of Alabama Anti-Illegal Immigration Legislation

September 29th, 2011 No comments
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On Wednesday, a federal judge refused to block key parts of a closely watched Alabama immigration law considered by many the strictest state effort to clamp down on illegal immigration, including a measure that requires immigration checks of public school students.

U.S. District Judge Sharon Blackburn authored the 115-page opinion finding some parts of the law conflict with federal statutes, but others don’t. Left standing at least temporarily are several key elements that help make the Alabama law stricter than similar laws passed in Arizona, Utah, Indiana and Georgia. Other federal judges already have blocked all or parts of those.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said most of the law was still intact and the state will enforce it. He planned to work with the state attorney general’s office to appeal those parts that the judge blocked. The judge’s previous order blocking the entire law expires Thursday.

Link to Associated Press Article.

Ten Important Things About E-Verify That Everyone Should Know

September 15th, 2011 1 comment
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E-Verify is an immigration enforcement tool. It is the federal government’s Internet-based system that allows employers to check whether prospective employees are legally authorized to work in the United States. Currently, only 4 percent of all American businesses use the system, but House Judiciary Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) has introduced the Legal Workforce Act of 2011, H.R. 2164, to make E-Verify mandatory for all employers across the country.

This mandate would cost Americans their jobs and crush small businesses. And an important point that appears to be lost in Rep. Smith’s proposal is that E-Verify does not even work at catching unauthorized workers—precisely what it is designed to do. The real solution is to pair E-Verify with a program that ensures a full legal workforce and to phase it in gradually to allow the government to make it error proof.

Here are ten things everyone should know about E-Verify and the Legal Workforce Act of 2011.

New Film, “A Better Life”, Attempts to Put a Human Aspect on the Immigration Debate

July 13th, 2011 No comments
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A undocumented alien’s plight lodged itself in producer Paul Junger Witt’s heart, pushing him for 25 years to bring the dramatized story to life onscreen.

A Better Life,” the result, is the rare Hollywood film that focuses on a Latino family in the United States and, rarer still, takes an intimate view of the price paid by illegal immigrants making their bid for the American dream.

The movie, opening Friday, is intended to be apolitical regarding the immigration issue, Witt said, but he wants it to spark more than ticket sales.

“I think people on both sides can politicize it and that’s not unhealthy, because it will promote dialogue and discussion. This issue isn’t going away,” he said. “If that’s one of the results of this film coming out, so be it. It needs to be talked about.”

Witt is a veteran Hollywood producer with credits including “The Golden Girls” and films such as “Insomnia” and “Three Kings.”

 

United States Border Patrol Apprehensions Decline Over the Last Decade

May 24th, 2011 No comments
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The U.S. Border Patrol released statistics regarding border patrol apprehensions over the last decade.

The Tucson, Arizona sector consistently led the nation for illegal alien apprehensions. San Diego, California was the second highest sector.

Undocumented alien arrests peaked in fiscal year 2000 and consistently declined over the decade. There was a rise in apprehensions in fiscal year 2004-2006.

In 2010, the number of border apprehensions was at its lowest in the last ten years.

Not surprisingly, the southwest border accounted for nearly 97% of all apprehensions, while the northern border and coastal borders accounted for the remaining 3 %

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